Why Homesteaders Should Consider Quail Farming

  • Think of your typical farm animals. You’re probably picturing a chicken, cow, pig, horse, etc. What about a quail? That bird probably didn’t make your list alongside the rest of them. After all, the song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” doesn’t really include a quail.

    Quails can provide many overlooked benefits to homesteaders. They’re not your traditional farm bird, but it turns out that they fit well into all types of homesteads. It’s easy to shy away from an animal like the quail since they’re not a long-established member of the farm animal family. These benefits might change your mind.

    Let’s take a look at why quails should become a permanent part of your homestead!

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    54 Comments

    1. Trent Long said:

      Personally, I think their to small, and a bit annoying. My grandpa loves them and raised them though. 🙂

    2. Shawn Sherwood said:

      Quail is a outstanding little partridge excellent eating and everyone should focus on raising some kind of poultry

    3. Bill Nipe said:

      If your farming anything your stuck in one place nomads will survive

    4. Kenn Schoonover said:

      nope. turn ’em loose and theyre gone. they breed well and they’re pretty fun.

    5. Ryan Shumaker said:

      Quail are good birds for small amounts of meat but for farming eggs, it takes about 4 of theirs to equal a chickens.

    6. Jeffrey J. McClain said:

      One big problem, you have to get a permit from your State Conservation Dept. to raise them.

    7. Eddie Long said:

      Free range means they’re gone in sixty seconds and you’ll never see them again. Not a domesticated bird like hens or turkey.

    8. Darcie Banks said:

      You don’t need a license to raise them. At least not in Colorado. There’s other states I know of homesteaders raising them without needing permits as well. When you get more into breeding a bunch and doing a catch and release thing for hunting purposes on your property, that’s when youre looking at needing permits…But where were at in Colorado, anyone can get their hands on them without any trouble. we raised quail in the city along with chickens and were fine…the more in the country we moved the more quail and cornish hens are being raised just like turkeys and chickens out here…
      Also, their eggs are smaller but theyre safer and healthier to consume then chicken eggs. Quails have different body temperatures so there’s no risk of ecoli or salmonila either. You can eat the quail eggs straight from the coop raw and have no adverse effects. In fact, theyre quite good for you. They have more protein in one tiny egg then in an entire chicken egg. More vitamins and minerals… Consuming them daily can reduce exema, anxiety, inflammation, raise immunity, cure and prevent cancer, the list goes on…

    9. George Kolankowski said:

      There’s a problem with this , because they can become endearing to the wife …….ssooooooo…………….

    10. Susan Starr said:

      Go to the endangered farm animals. It’s pretty scary, raise something.

    11. Kenny James said:

      I’ve had quail for around a year and a half and I just don’t see the benefit of having them. I’m pretty sure I’m doing something wrong, but my only real justification for having them is just to have an extra source of protein.

    12. Greg Holmes said:

      Ive raised many quail in my lifetime and its more to it than this guy wrote about.

    13. Shanelle Stogner said:

      We have quail…I love them…I have 4 different types…ppl love the fresh eggs and I pickle them and we also eat them….stuffed with boudin and wrapped with bacon on the grill…soooo good…

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